Sunday, February 03, 2008

Wonder what they're trying to hide?

Have just spotted an interesting response from the Government about the progress of the ID Cards projects. Asked about what Gateway Review the Office of Government Commerce had produced and if the Home Office would be publishing them, Meg Hillier confrimed that there had been a number but that
"The Identity and Passport Service has no current plans to publish the reports on the Gateway reviews."
Probably worth someone doing an FoI on those then. Especially considering that there have been allegations in the past that the Treasury had ordered the shredding of Gateway Reviews. The Gateway Review is a tool for monitoring the progress of projects, including budgetary issues and RAG reporting. Wonder why the Home Office won't publish them? Perhaps No2ID will get hold of them. They will rpobably make interesting reading.

2 comments:

dreamingspire said...

Gateway reviews of the ID Card project prior to October 2006 are really only of historical interest, as the project was largely revised in autumn 2006. If you hadn't spotted it, its now the National Identity Scheme with an emerging (or perhaps not) NIS Strategic Suppliers Framework (OJEU Notice last August).
Gateway Reviews only look at the paperwork, and do not really review a project. If you look at http://www.homeofficewatch.com/index.php/2007/10/03/1000-days-and-still-waiting/ (not updated recently - maybe Mr Huhne will read this and do something), you will see that attempts to use FOI have not worked.

NO2ID said...

Actually the project is in the course of further radical revisions, as recently leaked documents show.

They may be only of historical interest, but there is reason to believe the gateway reviews were not "green". There is a case going to the High Court with the Home Office appealing against the decision of the Information Tribunal on its appeal against the decision of the Information Commissioner that it must release the Gateway Zero for the scheme in response to an FOIA request. It is extremely hard to see what points they have to take, the decisions they are appealing being quite clear.

So the Home Office is spending hundreds of thousands of pounds of taxpayers money on lawyers to try to avoid releasing a now-irrelevant

So Hillier's answer is scarcely a surprise.