Wednesday, July 16, 2008

Stalin - man of the nation?

We have seen in recent weeks how the British Government is squaring up to Russia and how intelligence sources are worried about the seemingly anarchic state. As such we should take this news with seriousness.

When Russians en masse decide that Stalin - a man that made Hitler look like a pussycat when it came to killing his own population - should be the face of the nation one should realise that whilst the "Cold War" ended, the thaw has yet to really take place in the grassroots.

6 comments:

Benjamin Gray said...

Yes but look who the competition is. Is this so much a vote for Stalin as a vote against the Tsar, vilified since 1917 and before?

Anonymous said...

Did you read the comment from "Pepe" in London on the Times website?

At first I thought he was being sarcastic, but then I was reminded of just how blindly evil the left is.

Anonymous said...

The article also says the voting site isn't protected against multiple clicking from one computer - so the results can easily be manipulated by organised voting, which it clearly states the Communist party has engaged in. So this isn't so much a popular vote as a propaganda exercise.

Anonymous said...

Hmmm..
How does Napolean square up in France? Seen as a Great Leader or a ruthless world conquering madman?

Francis Drake. Hero or Pirate?

Anonymous said...

"Francis Drake. Hero or Pirate?"

Both, glory to his name. England needs less jobsworths and managers and more pirates and adventurers if it is to become great again.

Sophie Fernandes said...

This has been happening more and more over a number of years. I remember reading an article in the Foreign Affairs Journal a few years back on this very subject. The younger generation appear to be 'embracing' Stalin for two reasons: 1)They see Russia in the, let's face it pretty dire and weak state it is in now and look back at Stalin and how he supposedly brought strength. 2) Secondly, schools and books in Russia fail to drive home how truly evil Stalin was, thus making him an accessible and somewhat presentable 'hero'.